January 2016

S M T W T F S
     1 2
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31      

Page Summary

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Tuesday, July 25th, 2017 11:45 am

Posted by Jen Bettencourt

Long distance key chain by Etsy seller JulieElizabethCo

We are lucky to live in a time when families of all shapes and sizes are not only tolerated but are also celebrated. No matter who is a part of your valued clan, they are likely people who mean something to you and with whom you enjoy spending time in one way or another. So what do you do when they are spread out over the coast, country, or even world? I'm here to tell you how to make the most of this common situation.

I'm from Massachusetts and my family lives in Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Florida, Maryland, Delaware, Colorado, and California. What does this mean for me? A few things: I do a lot of iMessaging and FaceTiming, I have a JetBlue credit card, and I can pack an overnight bag faster than many people can pack their lunches. Is it always my preference for my family and I to be separated by a car, train, or plane ride away? Of course not. But over time, I have not only learned to live with my far-flung family, but have also learned to see the positives in this situation.

Know that distance is only physical

It can be difficult not to take distance personally, especially when family members have moved away from your mutual home state. The thing is, the choice to live somewhere else has nothing to do with you. People move to different places for so many reasons – work, retirement, change of pace, or even for fun – and you have to accept that. I can guarantee you that it is just as hard for your family to be away from you at times as it is for you to be away from them. Know that distance is what you make it. It can feel isolating or lonely but it doesn't have to. Try to rise to the occasion and let it change your relationships for the better.

Leverage the time you DO have

Since my family members and I don't have the luxury of seeing each other as often as we'd like, we squeeze in as much as humanly possible when we are together. I don't mean that we over-schedule ourselves to the point of exhaustion, but rather that we prioritize the things we enjoy the most and make time for them. We soak up each minute of our visits and appreciate each other's company.

This may sound excessive (or awesome), but my sister and I are known to go out for brunch each-and-every day of my visits to Philadelphia. My dad and I cook a four-course meal just for ourselves in his home in North Carolina because it's what we love to do. My mom and I spend quality time together treasure hunting at her local HomeGoods, even though we've been there dozens of times and it isn't Instagram worthy. My point is to do what you love with the ones you love, no matter how much (or how little) time you have.

The other cool thing? I am lucky enough to have couches on every coast with open invitations. While I have just as much fun hanging out as my family members' places as being a tourist in their cities, I do love tasting regional delicacies or seeing the local sites. I have the unique privilege of not only having to travel to see my family, but GETTING to.

"If you miss me" pillow by Etsy seller CreativePillowLV

Use your local network

There are many times that I think to myself "I wish [specific family member] were here with me to do [specific activity]." I have learned two things over time:

  1.  Sometimes even texting my cousin to let her know that I am doing something and wish she were with me gives me the warm fuzzies I would have gotten from experiencing it with her.
  2. There is often someone else in my own state who would be just as enthusiastic about the activity as I am.
I have had game nights with my in-laws, lunched with old friends, and crafted with work friends. I have come to appreciate the greatness of the people around me instead of solely focusing on the people I miss.

Not only do I value my local network for the fun stuff, but also for the hard stuff. I am lucky to have in-laws and several circles of friends who are always willing to support me during difficult times.

Just knowing that someone who cares about you is in your figurative and geographical corner can make all the difference. And for those times that I just need my mom, she is still always a phone call or visit away.

Monday, July 24th, 2017 07:17 pm

⌈ Secret Post #3855 ⌋

Warning: Some secrets are NOT worksafe and may contain SPOILERS.

01.


More! )


Notes:

Secrets Left to Post: 02 pages, 27 secrets from Secret Submission Post #551.
Secrets Not Posted: [ 0 - broken links ], [ 0 - not!secrets ], [ 0 - not!fandom ], [ 0 - too big ], [ 0 - repeat ].
Current Secret Submissions Post: here.
Suggestions, comments, and concerns should go here.
Tuesday, July 25th, 2017 12:06 am
 
If there's a tax loophole that lets middle aged white women pay their taxes with explicit sex fics, I'm owed one hell of a refund.

New Rule updates:
-All US Politics must stick to one thread.
-For a wide variety of reasons, no deliberate variant fonts, no emoji in thread titles. You can use them in the comment, but not in the title.

All the [community profile] fail_fandomanon Rules and Information (and Ban Requests): http://fail-fandomanon.dreamwidth.org/1076.html. The short version: no embeds, don't out people's real names, don't be that much of an asshole, body fluids are off topic, Mods reserve the right to freeze, screen, and delete the fuck out of stuff. FFA discussion covers a wide variety of topics and has a very flexible view of 'fandom' that includes politics, current events, and cooking techniques. FFA is a Choose NOT to Warn experience. Meme away.

Other posts and resources relevant to your interests:

NB: Meme rules do not require spoiler cuts/white-text/etc. Though, if you want to use spoiler cuts, a wonderful nonnie found a way to add them to DW. Just use the code below.
<div tabindex="-1"><b>spoiler title</b><div>Some spoilery content.</div></div>
See here for a detailed explanation and caveats.

If you would like to be banned to avoid anonfailing please leave a comment at the rules post here: http://fail-fandomanon.dreamwidth.org/1076.html

Next post: Will open when this post hits 6000 comments
Previous post: http://fail-fandomanon.dreamwidth.org/268657.html
Regular view - First page: http://fail-fandomanon.dreamwidth.org/268989.html
Regular view - Last page: http://fail-fandomanon.dreamwidth.org/268989.html?page=1000
Top Level view - First page: http://fail-fandomanon.dreamwidth.org/268989.html?view=top-only#comments
Top Level view - Last page: http://fail-fandomanon.dreamwidth.org/268989.html?view=top-only&page=1000#comments
Flat view - First Comment: http://fail-fandomanon.dreamwidth.org/268989.html?view=flat#comments
Flat view - Most Recent: http://fail-fandomanon.dreamwidth.org/268989.html?view=flat&page=1000
Dememe flatview emulator is at http://dememe.info/flat_view (same login as the regular Dememe info above).
Monday, July 24th, 2017 08:29 pm

Posted by (@NWSBayArea)

Temperatures across the region this afternoon are running a few to as much as 15 degrees cooler (Santa Rosa) compared to 24 hours ago.

Monday, July 24th, 2017 03:45 pm

Posted by Catherine Clark

Wedding palm fronds and monstera plants are our new favorite obsession
Gina and DJ's ceremony backdrop of our dreams | Photo by Briana Morrison Photography
When it comes to wedding trends, I am so on board with anything botanical. When succulents got popular, I was totally down. And now we're starting to see wedding palm fronds and monstera plants leak over from home decor trends into weddings and WE ARE IN. They're tropical, they're super chic, and they pair really well with white and metallic decor.

Plus, they're everywhere so it's easy to craft up a whole theme around them. Let's take a look at about a billion ways to bring in some palms and monstera deliciosas into your wedding decor… Let's put a bird leaf on it!

Wedding palm fronds and monstera plants are our new favorite obsession
Tropical Wedding Invitation Suite from Paper Minx Designs
Wedding palm fronds and monstera plants are our new favorite obsession
These fake fronds can be used as placemats or on top of plates for a gorgeous display (Via Amazon)

Like this!

Wedding palm leaves and monsteras are our new favorite obsession
Monstera Leaf Placemat Sheets from Kenley Kreations Inc

Or this!

Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Gina and DJ's ceremony backdrop | Photo by Briana Morrison Photography

Or this!

Instagram Photo

Wedding palm fronds and monstera plants are our new favorite obsession
Palm invitations (and other matching goodies!) by Vistaprint
Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Via Inspired by This | Photo by Kelsey Albright Photography
Wedding palm fronds and monstera plants are our new favorite obsession
Step the Record Straight Vegan Flat in Palms from ModCloth
Wedding palm fronds and monstera plants are our new favorite obsession
Tickle Me Picnic A-Line Dress in Tropical Fronds from ModCloth
Wedding palm fronds and monstera plants are our new favorite obsession
Palm Leaf Wrapping Paper from When it Rains Paper
Wedding palm fronds and monstera plants are our new favorite obsession
Monstera Cake Topper from lightpaper
Wedding palm leaves and monsteras are our new favorite obsession
Felt Leaf Garland from HandcraftLab
Wedding palm leaves and monsteras are our new favorite obsession
Palm Leaf Paper Plates from tulleANDtwig
Wedding palm leaves and monsteras are our new favorite obsession
Set of 12 Monstera cupcake toppers from poppyandchi
Wedding palm leaves and monsteras are our new favorite obsession
Monstera Leaf Paper Straws from ByEmilySmith
Wedding palm leaves and monsteras are our new favorite obsession
Monstera Large Leaf Lasercut Fan Program from AprilTwentyFive
Wedding palm leaves and monsteras are our new favorite obsession
Wedding embroidery hoop from MissKatiuska
Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Floral Bridesmaid Invitation from Butterfly Ghost
Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Leaf place cards from CraftCut
Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Palm Leaf Party Cups from Oh Goodie Events
Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Door hanger printable from Happy Party Studio
Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Monstera Leaf Acrylic Cake Toppers from CaliforniaLustre
Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Tropical Party Theme Wedding Napkin from PartyPaperPresents
Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Dolly Dress "Pastel Paradise" from HeartsandFound

And for your "monstera girl"…

Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Sloth and monstera dress from annanemone
Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Heart-shaped palm leaf print (use as a guest book!) from ScandinavianWalls
Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Monstera hoop earrings from Adriana Soto
Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Faux Monstera plant in lieu of a bouquet or hung on the wall, from dirtcouture

Use them like this…

Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Via Home Polish | Photo by Claire Esparros

Or like this!

Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Via Martha Stewart Weddings | Photo by Bryan Gardner
Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Monstera Deliciosa Nail Decals from KimsNailedIt
Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Minty Monstera enamel pin favors from PardonMyTone
Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Monstera and Palm Leaf Bunting from AllHerGlory
Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Plant leaf trim for decor from CloudCraftShop

Monstera cookie favors that are almost too pretty to teat…

Instagram Photo

Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Make this Monstera Deliciosa Round Blanket your table runner or ceremony backdrop! From CasaLovina
Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Adorable pouches for bridesmaid gifts from stypsstudio
Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Tropical Palm Leaf Confetti from OhsoLively
Wedding palms and monstera decor are our new favorite obsession
Wedding Welcome Sign from HHpaperCO

Yep, this is also how WE feel about wedding palms and monsteras…

Gina loving on the decor! Photo by Briana Morrison Photography
Monday, July 24th, 2017 03:33 pm

Posted by (@NWSBayArea)

Farallon Islands weather and seas: Fog, visibility 1/4 mile, SE wind 5 knots, air temp 55, pressure 1012 mb, swell NW 4 ft every 8 seconds.

Sunday, July 23rd, 2017 08:52 pm

Posted by Phil Plait

2

 

[Note: There is a lot to say about this eclipse. Every time I thought I was done writing this, I remembered something else I had to tell you about! Once it hit 3000 words I figured it was better to split it into two parts. Part 1, today’s post, is an introduction to the eclipse: why it’s a big deal, how it works, and where to go see it. Tomorrow, Part 2, will have information on how to safely observe the eclipse – what you can do to see it, and just as importantly what you shouldn’t do, as well as equipment you might want to have handy. I’ll also have extensive links with more information.]

Get ready, America. The Moon is about to eat the Sun.

Yesterday (Sunday, July 23, 2017) was the new Moon, when the Moon is closest to the Sun in the sky. That means we are just one lunation —one complete cycle of lunar phases — away from what may be the most viewed eclipse in human history.

I say that with some confidence. For one thing, there are more people alive today than ever before, so we have that going for us. Plus, the path of this eclipse cuts right across the continental United States, including some major cities; for millions of people the farthest they need to travel to see it is to their front yard.

And then there’s the internet. I expect the live streaming for this event will be one of the biggest data streams we’ve ever seen. I wonder how many millions of photos will be taken during the roughly two minutes of totality …

So what’s the big deal? Why is there so much fuss over this?

This eclipse is a big deal.

For one thing, total solar eclipses in any given spot on the Earth are rare. They happen roughly once or twice a year somewhere on Earth, but it’s a big planet, and a lot of it is hard to reach. 70% is ocean, and a lot of what’s left of the real estate is taken up by places like the Arctic and Antarctic. So getting a total solar eclipse over, say, the U.S. doesn’t happen often. The last one was in 1979, and that one cut a shallow chord across the northwest.

For another, total solar eclipses are one of the most beautiful, wondrous, awe-inspiring sights nature provides for us. The Moon slowly covers the Sun, taking nearly 90 minutes. In the last seconds before the Sun is totally covered, the sky grows dark, the air cools, birds fooled into thinking night has fallen stop singing … and then the moment arrives.

Totality. The last bit of solar surface is blocked by the Moon, and the glory of the corona is revealed.

solar eclipse

The total solar eclipse of 1999, seen in France. Note the pearly corona and the red glow of huge eruptions of hydrogen off the Sun’s surface, driven by the turbulent solar magnetic field. Credit: Luc Viatour

Ah, the Sun’s outer atmosphere, the ethereally thin gas that is normally invisible due to the Sun’s overwhelming glare. But when the Sun is behind the Moon, the corona is visible, sometimes reaching out for several times the Sun’s diameter. Shaped by magnetic forces, it can appear wispy, or shot through with tendrils, or as just a smooth glow. It all depends on the Sun’s magnetic mood at that moment.

I know many people who have seen total solar eclipses, and they all say ­—every last one of them— that it’s one of the most beautiful things they have ever seen in their entire lives. For a few moments, under the shadow of the Moon, people gasp, choke up, even weep openly.

Or so I hear. I’ve never seen a total solar eclipse. A partial one, sure, many times, but never total. After all these decades of being an astronomer, this will be my first.

So if it’s your first too, here’s some advice on what to do, where to go, and what you’ll see.

An eclipse primer

I have some details about how eclipses work below, but first, I devoted an entire episode of Crash Course Astronomy to eclipses (both solar and lunar), and it has most of the basic info you need to understand the whys and hows of this. It’s only a few minutes, so watch!

That was a lot in a short amount of time, I know. In the interest of making sure this is understandable, here are some more details.  

The Moon orbits the Earth about once per month. As it does so it passes by the Sun once per month as well, usually getting a degree or two away from it in the sky. But every now and again this celestial dance aligns, and the Moon passes directly in front of the Sun. That’s a solar eclipse. The Moon is casting its shadow on the Earth!

One of the most common questions I get asked is, why don’t we get a total solar eclipse every four weeks? I explain it in the Crash Course episode, but this video shows it a bit better:

The green square represents the orbit of the Earth. The Sun is in that plane, far to the left. The blue is the plane of the Moon. Looking down, they seem coincident. But when we view from an angle, we see they’re not (like one hula hoop wedged inside another, they intersect at two opposite points, called “nodes”). The Moon’s orbit is tilted by about 5° with respect to the Earth’s, so usually at new Moon (when the Moon is between the Earth and Sun) it passes above or below the Sun in the sky. But a couple of times a year, the Moon happens to be new just as it passes a node, and you get an eclipse.

So what happens during the actual eclipse?

At first you see a little dip (called “first contact”), a nibble, taken out of the side of the Sun as the leading edge of the Moon moves onto the Sun’s face. As the Moon progresses in its orbit you see a deeper and deeper cut into the Sun (the Moon appears dead black during an eclipse because it’s between us and the Sun, so we’re seeing its unlit side, plus the Sun is so bright it totally overwhelms the far darker Moon). The Sun appears as thick crescent, then a thinner one … and then suddenly the Sun is gone, completely blocked by the Moon.

This is “second contact,” or more commonly: totality.

diamond ring effect

Moments before totality in the 2012 Australian eclipse, just a small part of the Sun is still visible, creating a “diamond ring” effect. Note the red glow from hydrogen gas (the green smear is an internal reflection in the camera lens). Credit: Romeo Durscher

 / NASA

The time from first to second contact is roughly 70 – 90 minutes, depending on your location. Totality lasts only minutes, however, because of a cosmic coincidence…

The size of an object on the sky depends on two things: How big it is, and how far away it is. The Moon is 3474 kilometers across, and at the time of the eclipse will be about 366,000 km from the Earth’s center. The Sun is 1,391,000 km across and will be a little over 151 million kilometers from the Earth at the time of the eclipse.

So the Sun is 400 times wider than the Moon, but will be 412 times farther away. These numbers almost exactly balance out, so the Sun and Moon will appear to be the same size in the sky!

Well, almost. The Sun is actually more than 400 times farther away, so it appears fractionally smaller than the Moon. That’s good news for us! If they were exactly the same size, totality would last a fraction of a second. But because the Sun looks smaller, it takes time for the Moon to move across it. For this eclipse, given their sizes and distances, and how fast the Moon moves across the sky (about 1.1 degrees every hour), this all shakes out to totality lasting roughly two minutes.

I’ll get back to that in a sec. But once those two minutes or so are up, the Moon’s trailing edge uncovers the Sun, and boom! Totality is over. That’s called third contact. Then, over the course of the next 70 - 90 minutes the whole thing plays out in reverse. The Sun looks like a thin crescent, then a thicker one… and finally the trailing edge of the Moon leaves the Sun altogether. That’s fourth contact, but more importantly, it means the whole thing is done.

But totality is the big show. That’s due to combination of factors. One is environmental: During an eclipse, it gets dark. I mean, duh, but this is really something! It gets dark during the middle of the day, which is weird. This doesn’t happen until minutes before totality, actually; even when the Sun is half covered or more you might not notice. But in the minutes leading up things around you start to change.

And once the Sun is totally covered, things change immediately. That’s when the sky gets actually dark, like a deep twilight. You might see stars, and some planets (like Mars and Venus toward the west [to the right in the sky], Mercury very close to the Sun [below and to the left] and Jupiter and Saturn to the east [left] —this sky map should help). And of course, the solar corona.

The corona is invisible right up until the last moment before totality. But then it pops into view, far fainter than the Sun but obvious once the Sun is gone. This is what I’m looking forward to seeing the most. I’ve only seen pictures of it, and it’ll be very cool —to say the least!— to see it for myself.

There are tons of details about what to look for during those precious brief minutes of totality. I talk a little bit about them in the Crash Course video (the diamond ring effect, Baily’s beads, and more) but the American Astronomical Society has a nice brief synopsis of what to watch out for. There’s enough there to get you started, and a good Google search will fill in the blanks.

So now you know how this works, and what to look for. The next big question is obvious.

Where do I go to see it?

In Part 2 of this post I’ll go over how to safely observe the eclipse, but to see it at all you need to plan ahead. The Moon’s shadow on the Earth is relatively small and moves rapidly, so you need to be at the right place at the right time!

path of the eclipse

The path of the eclipse across the US. For anyone in between the blue lines the eclipse is total, and the centerline is in red. “GD” is the spot of greatest duration where the eclipse lasts the longest; “GE” is Greatest Eclipse where the axis of the Moon’s shadow falls closest to the center of the Earth. Credit: Fred Espenak / NASA

This map shows the path of the eclipse. If you go anywhere between the two blue lines, you’ll see a total eclipse. The red line is the centerline of the path, where the Moon appears to cut most directly across the Sun, and so the closer you are to that line the longer the eclipse will last.

If you’re outside the lines, the eclipse won’t be total. The farther away from it you are, the less of the Sun will be covered. You’ll get a partial eclipse, which is still very cool! But you won’t get the glory of totality.

There is an interactive map of the eclipse online (care of NASA and eclipse expert Fred Espenak). You can click on it and it’ll tell you how much of the Sun is covered from that location, as well as the times of the eclipse events (it might help to check the box labeled “Large map” on the lower right). It’s extremely useful, so check it out! Important: The times listed are in Universal Time, so you’ll want to make sure you have the right conversion. In August, Pacific time is UT – 7 hours, Mountain is UT – 6, Central is UT – 5, and Eastern UT – 4.

Also, here’s a video showing the Moon’s shadow sweeping across the US (note that the local times, duration, latitude and longitude of the shadow center, and the altitude of the Sun over the horizon are shown on the left):

Having said that, here’s the bad news: You can bet that pretty much every hotel in the path of totality is booked. You can try to find one, and please do! But I suspect it’ll be difficult. Many have been booked for a year or more.

Worse, traffic will be very difficult. Because the eclipse happens in the late morning to midday for many locations, a lot of people will get up early and drive to the centerline. A lot of the locations are rural, and not designed to handle thousands of cars all at once. So be prepared: If you get stuck in a traffic jam five kilometers north of the line, you’ll miss totality! This website has traffic info and has links to real-time traffic data. It should prove useful. Apparently there are still campsites and RVC parks available; check here for more.

Also, be aware of weather. If it’s cloudy, you won’t see it (though it’ll get completely dark, like nightfall, which is kinda cool). There’s a map online with historic cloud cover of the sky that will show you where the best places are to see it, statistically speaking.

Now, if you don’t want to or cannot travel far (or you already live in the eclipse path), you still have options. For one thing, there will be a ton of live feeds streamed online, and I’ll have links to some in Part 2.

You can also find out if there’s a museum, a planetarium, a university, or an astronomy club near you. I strongly suspect many of them in the country will be holding viewing parties at the time of the eclipse. This has lots of advantages: experts on tap, access to observing equipment (and it’ll be far more likely to be safe to use, too; see below), live feeds from the centerline, and what will no doubt be a festive atmosphere for the event.

I expect a lot of schools may be holding events as well for the students. If you’re a parent, see if they’ll allow you to attend — maybe even volunteer to help out! They may need help distributing safe viewing glasses, talking to the students, and especially making sure everyone stays safe and views the event in the correct manner so no one damages their eyes.

And that brings me to the next part … observing this rare and wonderful astronomical occurrence in a responsible manner that still maximizes the experience.

But that’s for tomorrow, in Part 2. Stay tuned!

Logo Format

Light Logo

Listicle Format

No Markers

Featured Post

Featured

Article Type

News

Is News

Breaking News

Normal

Standout Article

Image icon solareclipse_kalan.jpg

Hide Related Posts & Comments

Listicle

Listicle Display Type

Default

Video Hero Autoplay

Show the Media Gallery title

Show on Hero

Hero Image
Monday, July 24th, 2017 01:45 pm

Posted by Catherine Clark

Metallic, marble, and chic style: now THIS is fab modern wedding inspiration
Photos by The Photogenic Lab

We were blown away by the chic style, killer fashion, and amazing Denver Art Museum venue at the styled elopement of real life couple Gabriel and David. Much of the inspiration came from a painting by Zeng Fanzhi at the museum. They cultivated a colorful and sleekly modern style into which we want to sink. Think sharp grays and blues and fresh tidbits of saturated citrus color everywhere. It totally matches the art itself. And these boys are a work of art.

Come for the art, stay for the shoes (on everyone!), the ultra stylish invites, the metallic marble and geometric cake, and the couple #goals. This is some urban modern wedding inspiration we can get behind…

Metallic, marble, and chic style: now THIS is fab modern wedding inspiration

Metallic, marble, and chic style: now THIS is fab modern wedding inspiration

Metallic, marble, and chic style: now THIS is fab modern urban wedding inspiration

Metallic, marble, and chic style: now THIS is fab modern urban wedding inspiration

Metallic, marble, and chic style: now THIS is fab modern urban wedding inspiration

Metallic, marble, and chic style: now THIS is fab modern urban wedding inspiration

Metallic, marble, and chic style: now THIS is fab modern urban wedding inspiration

Metallic, marble, and chic style: now THIS is fab modern urban wedding inspiration

Metallic, marble, and chic style: now THIS is fab modern urban wedding inspiration

Metallic, marble, and chic style: now THIS is fab modern urban wedding inspiration

Metallic, marble, and chic style: now THIS is fab modern urban wedding inspiration

Metallic, marble, and chic style: now THIS is fab modern urban wedding inspiration

Metallic, marble, and chic style: now THIS is fab modern urban wedding inspiration

Metallic, marble, and chic style: now THIS is fab modern urban wedding inspiration

Metallic, marble, and chic style: now THIS is fab modern urban wedding inspiration

Metallic, marble, and chic style: now THIS is fab modern wedding inspiration

Metallic, marble, and chic style: now THIS is fab modern wedding inspiration

Metallic, marble, and chic style: now THIS is fab modern urban wedding inspiration

Metallic, marble, and chic style: now THIS is fab modern urban wedding inspiration

Metallic, marble, and chic style: now THIS is fab modern urban wedding inspiration

Vendors

Photographer: The Photogenic Lab • Jewelry: Abby Sparks • Invitation Designer: Ashley Gaffney Design • Floral Designer: Babylon Floral Design • Bridesmaid Dresses: Bella Bridesmaid Denver • Rentals: Butler Rents • Makeup Artist: Cassandra Garza Makeup Artist • Reception Venue: Denver Art Museum • Apparel: Goldyn • Hair Stylist: Hair by Bri Laffey • Event Planner: Hourglass Productions • Shoes: John Fluevog • Cake Designer: Sam Keith Cake Design • Mens' Attire: Ted's Clothiers • Apparel: The Knotty Tie

Gallery

Click to view slideshow.